Interview
Democracy Has Become Perverse by Dániel Pál Levente

Interview Marina Abramović On a cold winter morning in the midst of new precautionary lockdowns and new waves of new COVID variants, internationally famous conceptual and performance artist Marina Abramović was kind enough to set aside an hour or so to speak with me on Zoom about her work and her ideas on an array […]

Poetry
Underwatersong by Kinga Tóth

‘Wanderselig,wundertrunken Übt ein Vogel seinen Mund’ (Hugo Ball: Kind und Traum) Infants trumpet into elefánt-clouds bu-bo bu-bo: winged lions sing underwater nothing to see do you dare to look into the akvárium do you see letter-snakes rumble on your tongue “the good heart flutters in a bell jar” “churchbells rise upwards” (Kassák) the image is […]

Non-Fiction
Speak Closer: Poems of Statelessness and Speechlessness by Valzhyna Mort

Many years ago, in Berlin, I met a Hungarian writer. He was tall, smoked a pipe, and walked slightly bent forward, his black suit topped with a matching black hat. He had a child’s smile and a mole on his left cheek. Though both of us were multilingual, none of our languages matched. We were […]

Poetry
come closer by Marie Iljašenko

at the swimming spot you meet bodies marked by birthing, bearded vaginas, viral rashes on thighs (your own), gold chains and shame. swimming holes understand inclusion, not epiphany: you can sharpen your claws on them all day, but never wash away the tiredness and dust of the city (thus the showers) chlorinated water loses all […]

Poetry
Black Snow by Anna Terék

We barged along the silence of that winter. Wheat fields labored in the choke of ice.   By the barracks my father shifted from foot to foot. Nothing else moved in that frozen country. My mother, stock-still and angry. My sister and I, motionless. Motionless, other soldiers.   By the barracks he swayed with eyes half-closed, […]

Fiction
Biography of a Black-and-White Lamb by Tomáš Zmeškal

The District Military Administration for Prague 6 was located right next door to the local police precinct and the district court. Across the street loomed a spacious palace, built in historicist style during the First Republic, between the First and Second World Wars, for the Ministry of Defense, which was still located there. Around the […]

Non-Fiction
Cold War 2.0 by Sándor Jászberényi

on October 4, 2021 We have asked the linguist credited as being the most cited living scholar of our time about race, language, cancel culture, the world order, and the climate catastrophe. At 93 years of age, Professor Chomsky is doing fine. The same cannot be said of the world. Over the course of roughly […]

Art
Prejudice and what lies behind it by Continental Magazine

The photographs and communication strategy for the first issue of Continental Literary Magazine are based on the fact that everyone’s perceptions are shaped and limited by prejudice. To put it simply, none of us is free of prejudice. We have used for this issue photographs from the series Squares and Urban Flow by Hungarian photographer […]

Non-Fiction
I’m Here, I’m Disabled, Get Used To It by Judith Newman

(Sex On Wheels?) (Sexual Healing?) You’re so pretty for a girl in a wheelchair. Angelique Vito has to laugh; it’s just one of the more memorable things well-meaning people have said to her.  Oh, it’s so unfortunate you can’t have children.  Oh, you’re such an inspiration.  “They see me in this chair and the thinking […]