#continentalliterarymag

Fiction
Shanghai Bitter by Noémi László

Bottled by a Transylvanian Hungarian in English She stood with a half-emptied glass in one hand and an almost full glass in the other. A composed Chinese gentleman stepped in. He stepped out on the first floor. Ten minutes to eight and there she was, gin-and-tonicked and in love in the lobby, waiting for Zelda […]

Fiction
Love Money by Ildiko Noemi Nagy

Let me tell you about the first time I experienced love. She had red hair, black eyes, wore striped socks, and one of those shapeless, Little House on the Prairie-type dresses. Her name was Ann. She smelled like yarn and clean fabric. When I lifted Ann’s dress for the first time, I saw something else […]

Current
Two in the midst by Mila Haugová

All of time’s layers are in motion //claims upon light and dark Are rising//their splendid heads and hair (silk) Mouths in moist recesses //whatever else they may enjoy In this time of absolute pride.   Pale cross on the brow // near to zero and infinity (one day you’re everything for him next day you’re […]

Non-Fiction
Eight billion Shades – Capturing a World of Color by Attila Lóránt

Kodak, one of the most familiar names on the market in the world of photography, launched research into ways in which to produce darker tones simply in response to interest from chocolate producers and furniture factories, that were increasingly impatient to have photographs that captured a diversity of shades.   At the beginning of the […]

Poetry
If we indeed have souls by Zsuzsa Takács

It has no single form. And that’s the point! Can we trust in that which constantly changes its appearance? In Blind Hope? It could be a beggar on the street corner, or a young woman, servant to a house, marched off to Auschwitz together with her masters, to the Danube Delta or Vorkuta where she […]

Non-Fiction
God, White, Man by Attila Bartis

Seven years ago, as fate would have it, I arrived in Indonesia for the first time in my life, on Vesak. Vesak is the celebration of the birth, enlightenment, and departure from earthly existence—or Parinirvāna—of Gautama Buddha. Parinirvāna cannot really be called death, much like the crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension of Christ. From the perspective […]

Poetry
Magnetic fields of sympathy by Mila Haugová

In the intimacy of stripped-bare sounds I cannot remember any voice My hearing is failing my memory of sound or there is a rift so acute and deep that it escapes comprehension.   I step on the fragile November ice no it’s nothing unsafe // only tread inspired by water on the field path and […]

Current
White Price Comfort by William Pierce

I was reading Thomas Lynch’s The Undertaking recently. It’s a good book. First published in 1997, it came out at a time when, let’s be honest, most white Americans—like me—thought “race relations” were in a better place than most white Americans think they are now. Americans of color were, as ever, not fooled. They also […]

Poetry
On The Way To Magadan by Anna Terék

I’m wondering how far one’s desires can be from another’s. Aren’t you interested, mister? You just laugh, oblivious to the distance to Magadan.   What if we had gone anyway? I would be watching the ice, you’d be watching the endlessness, this is how we would be mirrored in that flat-frozen Siberia. Isn’t it how […]